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A TSCRA Member Benefit

Atypical BSE detected in Florida cow

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) has announced the discovery of an atypical case of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), a neurologic disease of cattle, in a six year old mixed-breed beef cow in Florida. This animal never entered slaughter channels and at no time presented a risk to the food supply, or to human health in the United States. Atypical BSE seems to arise rarely and spontaneously in all cattle populations. Read more…

General Discussion, Animal Health Read more... Aug 29, 2018

Longhorned tick now found in 6 New Jersey counties

The USDA’s National Veterinary Services Laboratory has confirmed that the longhorned tick, Haemaphysalis longicornis, has been discovered in Monmouth County, N.J., making it the sixth county in the state where the tick has been found. There have also been confirmed findings of the tick in Maryland, Pennsylvania, New York, North Carolina, Virginia, West Virginia and Arkansas. Longhorned ticks in other countries have been shown to spread diseases. They are known to infest a wide range of species including humans, dogs, cats and livestock. Read more…

General Discussion, Animal Health, General Discussion, Wildlife Read more... Aug 28, 2018

Trichomoniasis entry requirement rules adopted

Changes to rules about entry requirements regarding trichomoniasis, also known as trich, were adopted at a recent Texas Animal Health Commission (TAHC) meeting in Austin. The rules will go into effect on Sept. 3, 2018. Modifications were made to the bovine trichomoniasis interstate entry requirements to allow the entry of bulls moved directly to a federally approved livestock market from a premises of origin without a certificate of veterinary inspection or obtaining a permit prior to entry. Bulls entering Texas from a premises other than their premises of origin must be issued a permit before moving directly to a federally-approved livestock market that isolates the bull from female cattle at all times until the bull is tested. Read more…

General Discussion, Animal Health, General Discussion, Wildlife Read more... Aug 27, 2018

Protecting animals from wildfire smoke

Smoke does not only take a toll on humans. It can also affect pets, horses, livestock, and wildlife. The American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) says if can see or feel the effects of smoke yourself, you also should take precautions to keep your animals – both pets and livestock – safe. Read more…

General Discussion, Animal Health, General Discussion, Disaster, General Discussion, Wildlife Read more... Aug 24, 2018

Cattle industry secures 45-day agreement to reinstate spray boxes

Texas and Southwestern Cattle Raisers Association (TSCRA), Texas Cattle Feeders Association (TCFA), Texas Farm Bureau (TFB), Livestock Marketing Association of Texas (LMAT), Independent Cattlemen’s Association of Texas (ICA) and South Texans’ Property Rights Association (STPRA) attended a meeting with Texas Agriculture Commissioner Sid Miller Tuesday in Austin. The purpose of the meeting was to urge the Texas Department of Agriculture (TDA) to protect the cattle industry by allowing producers to continue utilizing spray boxes as part of their cattle fever tick eradication efforts. The producers and staff that attended the meeting on behalf of industry were able to reach a temporary compromise with TDA that will ensure our ability to protect the health and well-being of our cattle for the next 45 days. Read more…

General Discussion, Animal Health, General Discussion, Issues & Policy Read more... Aug 09, 2018

Cattle Heat Emergency Alert this week

A USDA-ARS Cattle Heat Stress Alert has been forecast for areas of Texas and Oklahoma, including a danger on Aug. 5, emergency on Aug. 6 and danger on Aug. 7. Cattle heat stress forecasts are produced as a partnership of USDA-ARS with NOAA and National Weather Service. For more information on forecast methods and breathing rates. Read more… 

General Discussion, Animal Health Read more... Aug 06, 2018

Need to haul water? Use a clean tank

No matter how well you clean it, a tank used to store or haul chemical shouldn’t be used to haul water to thirsty cattle. Any fertilizer or herbicide chemicals can leach into the plastic fibers and can contaminate any water with which the tank is filled. There’s no way to scrub, steam or clean it out. –BEEF Magazine Read more…

General Discussion, Animal Health Read more... Aug 06, 2018

TSCRA Govt Affairs Roundup: Spray box shutdown, industry meetings and farm bill

TSCRA government affairs staff are continuing to work diligently to resolve a serious cattle health issue created by Texas Agriculture Commissioner Sid Miller’s shuttering of fever tick spray boxes operated by the Texas Animal Health Commission and USDA–Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service. TSCRA staff and leaders are also attending the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association Summer Meeting in Denver and the 2018 West Texas Legislative Summit in San Angelo. Read more…

General Discussion, Animal Health, General Discussion, Issues & Policy Read more... Aug 03, 2018

Cattle raisers refute cattle fever tick spray box concerns

Texas Agriculture Commissioner Sid Miller announced this week his department is shutting down the use of cattle spray boxes to treat cattle fever ticks in South Texas. The Texas Animal Health Commission and Texas and Southwestern Cattle Raisers refute the reasons Miller has cited for the shut-down and maintain that portable spray boxes have been utilized for decades and have proven very effective in fever tick containment and eradication efforts. Read more…

General Discussion, Animal Health, General Discussion, Issues & Policy Read more... Aug 01, 2018

Protecting pets from coyotes and other wild animals

Although most wild animals mind their business and don’t bother humans, some wild animals, such as coyotes, can wander into human environments and cause harm to pets. Because coyote bites have the potential to cause severe body and organ damage, Christine Rutter, a clinical assistant professor at the Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences, recommends that every pet that is attacked by a coyote, bobcat, or an unknown animal be evaluated by a veterinarian as soon as possible. Owners should not attempt to address wounds at home. A bite from a wild animal also poses another threat—the spread of potential diseases, such as rabies. –Pet Talk by Texas A&M Vet Med & Biomedical Sciences Read more…

General Discussion, Animal Health, General Discussion, Wildlife Read more... Jul 25, 2018