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A TSCRA Member Benefit

Extreme heat: How you can prepare

The Texas summers can get hot and with proper preparation your animals can keep cool and hydrated during the summer months. The Texas Animal Health Commission offers a tips video to help keep your livestock safe. Read more…

General Discussion, Animal Health Read more... Jul 19, 2018

Invasive longhorned tick found in New York

The New York State Departments of Health and Agriculture & Markets have cautioned New York residents, visitors and farmers about the continued importance of taking measures to protect against ticks. The Haemaphysalis longicornis tick, commonly known as the longhorned tick, was recently discovered in multiple locations in Westchester County. The longhorned tick is not native to the United States and is commonly found in Australia, New Zealand and eastern Asia. However, these ticks have been found recently in New Jersey, Virginia, West Virginia, North Carolina and Arkansas. The tick is a concern for the agricultural industry and may pose a threat to livestock. Farmers and ranchers should continue to work with their veterinarians to check their animals, particularly cattle, sheep and horses, for exposure to ticks and to ensure their parasite control plans are up to date and working. Symptoms of tick-borne disease in cattle include fever, lack of appetite, dehydration, weakness and labored breathing. Read more…

General Discussion, Animal Health, General Discussion, Wildlife Read more... Jul 18, 2018

Longhorned tick confirmed in North Carolina

The invasive longhorned tick (Haemaphysalis longicornis) first identified in New Jersey in 2017, has now added North Carolina to its list of known U.S. residences. In addition to New Jersey, animal health officials have confirmed the presence of the species in Virginia, West Virginia and most recently, Arkansas. In its native range in East Asia, the tick is a serious livestock pest known to carry human and animal pathogens. –Drovers CattleNetwork Read more… 

General Discussion, Animal Health, General Discussion, Wildlife Read more... Jul 16, 2018

USDA culls deer carrying fever ticks in Port Mansfield

For decades, hundreds of whitetail deer have roamed the bayside fishing village of Port Mansfield, eating corn out of residents’ hands and luring families who see them as a tourist draw. Last month federal officials killed off 90 deer — about 25 percent of the area’s population — after the deer contracted cattle fever ticks. –The Brownsville Herald Read more…

General Discussion, Animal Health, General Discussion, Wildlife Read more... Jul 16, 2018

Be vigilant to catch foot rot early

Foot rot is not uncommon for ranchers and feedlot owners. The disease is dependent on the weather and soil moisture, and though it can’t be completely prevented, it can be decreased and treated. The stereotypical wet season of spring can make cattle stand in mud and soggy pasture, exposing their hooves to the bacteria that cause foot rot. During summer, unique circumstances can make cattle more prone to foot rot, including hot cattle standing in ponds for longer periods of time to cool off. BEEF Magazine 

General Discussion, Animal Health Read more... Jul 11, 2018

Kissing bugs spread deadly Chagas disease throughout Texas

Chagas disease is a misunderstood and often asymptomatic infection in people and dogs that was once believed to be only in Latin America. Studies indicate between 50 percent and 64 percent of kissing bugs, including those in Texas, carry the deadly parasite that causes Chagas, which is considered a major neglected tropical disease. Infections may result in mild or no symptoms, and many infected people may not show symptoms for life. However, an estimated 30 percent of infected people will develop debilitating and sometimes life-threatening conditions. –Corpus Christi CallerRead more…

General Discussion, Animal Health, General Discussion, Wildlife Read more... Jul 09, 2018

Monitor ponds for blue-green algae

Blue green algae blooms are an issue that usually gets discussed this time of year. Calm, sunny, dry, and hot days of summer create ideal conditions for blue green algae to thrive in our livestock ponds. Blue green algae occurrence is sporadic making its threat unpredictable. Despite its name, these blooms are not algae, but a cyanobacteria. Some of these cyanobacteria produce and release dangerous toxins that are of major concern for livestock. –Drovers CattleNetwork Read more… 

General Discussion, Animal Health Read more... Jul 05, 2018

Fly control considerations for cattle on pasture

Horn flies, face flies, and stable flies are not just irritants to livestock, but are economically important to producers due to negative impacts on milk production and calf weaning weights. In addition, they can affect grazing distribution and transmit eye diseases such as pinkeye and infectious bovine rhinotracheitis (IBR). It is difficult to predict what fly levels will be like for any given year, but hot, dry weather usually results in high numbers. It is important to understand identification and life cycles of pests affecting livestock in order to choose the most effective control options. –iGrow by SDSU Extension Read more…

General Discussion, Animal Health Read more... Jul 05, 2018

TAHC completes final region reorganization

Texas Animal Health Commission (TAHC) will merge portions of the Fort Worth region with the Lampasas and Mount Pleasant regions on June 29, 2018. This will be the final region merge for the TAHC and will facilitate cost savings to allow TAHC’s region offices to have the resources and personnel necessary to protect the health and marketability of Texas’ livestock, exotic livestock and domestic and exotic fowl. Read more…

General Discussion, Animal Health Read more... Jun 29, 2018

Longhorn ticks now in four states; vigilance suggested

Texas Animal Health Commission officials have confirmed the presence of the Longhorned tick (Haemaphysalis longicornis) in Benton County, Arkansas, increasing to four the number of states with confirmed sightings of the exotic Asian pest. The tick was first identified in New Jersey late last year, and since has been confirmed in Virginia, West Virginia and now Arkansas. TAHC would like to remind veterinarians and livestock producers to be vigilant and proactive as they observe and collect ticks on small and large animals. The current host list includes dog, cow, goat, sheep, white-tailed deer, opossum, raccoon and horse. Read more…

General Discussion, Animal Health, General Discussion, Wildlife Read more... Jun 18, 2018