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Avoid interfering with young wildlife

The best thing you can do for young wildlife is to keep young wildlife wild. Springtime is when people begin to see a variety of newborn and young animals. Newborn rabbits, squirrels, deer and birds easily appeal to most people’s sense of care and compassion. People often think these baby animals are “so cute” and imagine that they must be lost or abandoned. Usually that is not the case. Read more…

General Discussion, General Discussion, Wildlife Read more... May 14, 2018

Organizations come together for Soil and Water Stewardship Week

The Texas A&M Natural Resources Institute, or NRI, has partnered with other organizations to promote statewide land stewardship relating to pollinators. “Soil and Water Stewardship Week is from April 28 through May 6 this year, so like-minded organizations are collaborating to bring awareness to the importance of voluntary land stewardship in Texas through a statewide campaign emphasizing the role of pollinators in the environment. Some of these organizations include the Texas State Soil and Water Conservation Board, Association of Texas Soil and Water Conservation Districts, Texas Wildlife Association and Texas and Southwestern Cattle Raisers’ Association. Read more…

General Discussion, General Discussion, Wildlife Read more... May 04, 2018

Soil and Water Stewardship Week touts importance of pollinators in Texas

The Texas Parks and Wildlife Department (TPWD) has partnered with the Texas State Soil and Water Conservation Board, Association of Texas Soil & Water Conservation Districts, Texas Wildlife Association, and Texas and Southwestern Cattle Raisers Association (TSCRA) to highlight the importance of voluntary land stewardship in Texas. The Importance of pollinators to soil and water conservation in Texas is the theme of this year’s Soil and Water Stewardship Week, April 29 through May 6, 2018. Read more…

General Discussion, Wildlife Read more... Apr 30, 2018

Don’t let fire ants ruin your summer, take steps this spring

Dealing with fire ants is no picnic, but getting rid of them can be as easy as Step 1, Step 2, according to Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service experts. Spring is a good time to control fire ants as this is when they search for food and build mounds, which makes them easier to locate. Read more…

General Discussion, Wildlife Read more... Apr 26, 2018

Black-capped vireo delisted from endangered species list

Not so long ago the black-capped vireo nearly went extinct. Goats ate their way through this songbird’s habitat and brown-headed cowbirds commandeered their nests. In the late 1980s there were only about 350 birds known to exist, but thanks to robust conservation efforts, the small songbird is being removed from the list of endangered and threatened species. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service joined forces with the states of Oklahoma and Texas, the U.S. Army, private landowners and non-governmental organizations to protect and recover the vireo. Through the dedicated conservation efforts undertaken by these partners to address primary threats, conserve needed habitat and advance scientific understanding, the vireo has experienced a dramatic recovery. There are now more than 14,000 birds estimated across the vireo’s breeding range of Oklahoma, Texas and Mexico. Read more…

General Discussion, Wildlife Read more... Apr 16, 2018

Fungus causing white-nose syndrome in bats spreads into Central Texas

The fungus that causes white-nose syndrome (WNS) in bats, detected for the first time in Texas in early 2017 in the Panhandle, has now spread into Central Texas. Though no bat deaths have been attributed to WNS in Texas, the syndrome has killed millions of bats in the eastern parts of the United States, raising […]

General Discussion, General Discussion, Wildlife Read more... Apr 09, 2018

Are ants worse this year because of Hurricane Harvey?

Rice University ecologists are checking to see if Hurricane Harvey’s unprecedented floods gave a competitive boost to red imported fire ants (Solenopsis invicta) and tawny crazy ants (Nylanderia fulva), two of southeast Texas’ most important invasive ants. Fire ants in particular are well known to be flood-adapted: they survive by forming floating balls of ants.

General Discussion, General Discussion, Wildlife Read more... Apr 02, 2018

Confined deer operations reminded of April 1 MLDP reporting deadline

All Managed Land Deer Program (MLDP) participants must report the number of bucks and does harvested by April 1 of each year, even if no animals were taken. Failure to report harvest numbers by the deadline will result in MLDP tags not being issued for the succeeding season. Texas Wildlife Association has provided information at the following link: Read more…

General Discussion, Animal Health, General Discussion, Wildlife Read more... Mar 29, 2018

APHIS revises chronic wasting disease program standards

The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) is revising its Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) Program Standards to better meet the needs of both animal health officials and the cervid industry. To ensure consistent terminology, APHIS is aligning the language in the program standards with the Code of Federal Regulations. CWD is a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE), a progressive and fatal brain disease that can affect cervids, including deer, elk and moose.  The CWD Herd Certification Program (HCP) provides a national approach to control CWD in farmed cervid and is a cooperative effort between APHIS, state animal health and wildlife agencies, and farmed cervid owners. APHIS coordinates with state agencies to encourage cervid owners to certify their herds and comply with the CWD Herd Certification Program Standards to prevent the introduction and spread of CWD.

General Discussion, Animal Health, General Discussion, Wildlife Read more... Mar 29, 2018

Texas Parks and Wildlife Commission expands CWD containment zone in Panhandle

The Texas Parks and Wildlife Commission has approved expansion of the state’s chronic wasting disease (CWD) Panhandle Containment Zone following the discovery of the disease earlier this year in a roadkill white-tailed deer. The Containment Zone 2 now encompasses that portion of the state within the boundaries of a line beginning where I.H. 40 enters from the State of New Mexico in Deaf Smith County; thence east along I.H. 40 to U.S. 385 in Oldham County; thence north along U.S. 385 to Hartley in Hartley County; thence east along U.S. 87 to County Rd. 47; thence north along C.R. 47 to F.M. 281; thence west along F.M. 281 to U.S. 385; thence north along U.S. 385 to the Oklahoma state line.

General Discussion, Animal Health, General Discussion, Wildlife Read more... Mar 28, 2018