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A TSCRA Member Benefit

Protecting pets from coyotes and other wild animals

Although most wild animals mind their business and don’t bother humans, some wild animals, such as coyotes, can wander into human environments and cause harm to pets. Because coyote bites have the potential to cause severe body and organ damage, Christine Rutter, a clinical assistant professor at the Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences, recommends that every pet that is attacked by a coyote, bobcat, or an unknown animal be evaluated by a veterinarian as soon as possible. Owners should not attempt to address wounds at home. A bite from a wild animal also poses another threat—the spread of potential diseases, such as rabies. –Pet Talk by Texas A&M Vet Med & Biomedical Sciences Read more…

General Discussion, Animal Health, General Discussion, Wildlife Read more... Jul 25, 2018

Changes proposed to endangered species act to allow for economic and business factors

This week, the U.S. Department of Interior released proposed rule changes for the Endangered Species Act. Right now, the process used to protect species under the act requires only a scientific assessment of whether there’s a risk of extinction. The rule change would allow regulators to also consider economic and business factors. Read more…

General Discussion, Issues & Policy, General Discussion, Wildlife Read more... Jul 24, 2018

Invasive longhorned tick found in New York

The New York State Departments of Health and Agriculture & Markets have cautioned New York residents, visitors and farmers about the continued importance of taking measures to protect against ticks. The Haemaphysalis longicornis tick, commonly known as the longhorned tick, was recently discovered in multiple locations in Westchester County. The longhorned tick is not native to the United States and is commonly found in Australia, New Zealand and eastern Asia. However, these ticks have been found recently in New Jersey, Virginia, West Virginia, North Carolina and Arkansas. The tick is a concern for the agricultural industry and may pose a threat to livestock. Farmers and ranchers should continue to work with their veterinarians to check their animals, particularly cattle, sheep and horses, for exposure to ticks and to ensure their parasite control plans are up to date and working. Symptoms of tick-borne disease in cattle include fever, lack of appetite, dehydration, weakness and labored breathing. Read more…

General Discussion, Animal Health, General Discussion, Wildlife Read more... Jul 18, 2018

Longhorned tick confirmed in North Carolina

The invasive longhorned tick (Haemaphysalis longicornis) first identified in New Jersey in 2017, has now added North Carolina to its list of known U.S. residences. In addition to New Jersey, animal health officials have confirmed the presence of the species in Virginia, West Virginia and most recently, Arkansas. In its native range in East Asia, the tick is a serious livestock pest known to carry human and animal pathogens. –Drovers CattleNetwork Read more… 

General Discussion, Animal Health, General Discussion, Wildlife Read more... Jul 16, 2018

USDA culls deer carrying fever ticks in Port Mansfield

For decades, hundreds of whitetail deer have roamed the bayside fishing village of Port Mansfield, eating corn out of residents’ hands and luring families who see them as a tourist draw. Last month federal officials killed off 90 deer — about 25 percent of the area’s population — after the deer contracted cattle fever ticks. –The Brownsville Herald Read more…

General Discussion, Animal Health, General Discussion, Wildlife Read more... Jul 16, 2018

Lesser prairie-chicken population on the rise, but advocates say it’s not enough

The latest aerial survey shows there are thousands more of the grouse in the Texas Panhandle and four surrounding states. Still, the total is tens of thousands short of what endangered species experts say is needed to achieve true conservation. –The Texas Tribune Read more… 

General Discussion, Wildlife Read more... Jul 13, 2018

Kissing bugs spread deadly Chagas disease throughout Texas

Chagas disease is a misunderstood and often asymptomatic infection in people and dogs that was once believed to be only in Latin America. Studies indicate between 50 percent and 64 percent of kissing bugs, including those in Texas, carry the deadly parasite that causes Chagas, which is considered a major neglected tropical disease. Infections may result in mild or no symptoms, and many infected people may not show symptoms for life. However, an estimated 30 percent of infected people will develop debilitating and sometimes life-threatening conditions. –Corpus Christi CallerRead more…

General Discussion, Animal Health, General Discussion, Wildlife Read more... Jul 09, 2018

Hot, dry summer has scorpions in south Central Texas heading indoors

With rising Texas summer temperatures, humans aren’t the only life forms trying to find a cooler place. Scorpions don’t seem to like either very cold or very hot temperatures. And during hot, dry weather, they may seek out water and/or a more hospitable environment. Scorpions can typically be found under rocks, paving stones, logs or landscaping materials — or hiding in wood piles or inside the home. Read more…

General Discussion, Wildlife Read more... Jul 06, 2018

Invasive zebra mussels found in Grapevine Lake

Invasive zebra mussels have been discovered in Grapevine Lake, a popular outdoor recreation destination located in the Dallas-Fort Worth metroplex. Grapevine Lake is managed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Fort Worth District. Primarily built for the purposes of flood control and conservation, the lake is also popular as a boating, hunting, and fishing destination. Currently throughout the Trinity River Basin, one lake is classified as suspect, meaning zebra mussels or their larvae have been positively identified one time in the lake (Lake Ray Hubbard), five lakes are now classified as positive, meaning zebra mussels or their larvae have been documented more than once (Lakes Grapevine, Lavon, Richland Chambers, Worth and Fishing Hole Lake) and five more lakes are classified as infested, meaning they have an established, reproducing population (Lakes Bridgeport, Eagle Mountain, Lewisville, Livingston and Ray Roberts). Read more…

General Discussion, Wildlife Read more... Jul 02, 2018

Guadalupe County hunters to get paid to kill feral hogs, but rules apply

Feral hog tails will soon be valued at $5 a pop in Guadalupe County. The county commissioners court voted Tuesday morning to put a bounty on feral hogs in an effort to eliminate 2,000 hogs in the county. The program start date has not been established, but paperwork is anticipated to be in place by mid-July. Stipulations will apply to the program, including rules against intentionally breed feral hogs just for the program and bringing in hogs from outside county borders. Animal carcasses must be property disposed of and they can only harvest during the eligible period. –San Antonio Express-News Read more…

General Discussion, Wildlife Read more... Jun 29, 2018